There’s Nothing Ghostly about Travel Writing

5 January 2009 Post Author:
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There’s good news if you’re a travel writer. Would you like to know what it is? Of course you would that’s why you’re reading this blog!

U.S. News announced their “annual list of 30 best careers” and ghostwriter made the cut. You may be saying to yourself “what does that have to do with me, I’m a travel writer?” It has everything to do with you!

Think about the writing possibilities you could have using your travel writing expertise, emphasis on writing. You could write a guidebook or travel memoir. Being a travel writer could come in handy with these types of projects.

“U.S. News has plowed through hundreds of careers, looking for the jobs with the best outlook in this recessionary economy (and beyond), the highest rates of job satisfaction, the least difficult training necessary, the most prestige, and the highest pay. These careers have staying power: They’re smart moves now, and they’ll be smart moves for years to come” (visit U.S. News for more information.)

If you would like to write for large and important audiences, then ghostwriting is for you. Not only are you well paid, you have the opportunity to meet some interesting people. Plus, you’ll have a flexible schedule and can work from the comfort of your home.

The downside to ghostwriting is seeing your name in print. If you’re not an egomaniac this will not be a problem for you. On the other hand, if you receive a hefty paycheck, you may forget about being an egomaniac!

If you can write quickly and powerfully, ghostwriting could be a lucrative profession for you. If you suffer from writer’s block all of the time, you may want to reconsider the position. Also, you must be good at interviewing people. Can you get the facts? Are you able to get heart wrenching details? Don’t forget that it’s your client’s voice and not yours that will take center stage. Be prepared to accept some foolish edits and re-writes. This is where using Whitesmoke’s free trial (English grammar and writing software) can come in handy. You could use all of the help you can get when it comes to ghostwriting.

Who can you write for? You could write for celebrities and politicians who have traveled all over the world. Consider writing for websites, family histories, and Aunt Elizabeth’s travel memoir about her arrival in New York through Ellis Island.

If you have a knack for history, science, politics, or business, you’ll have an edge over other ghostwriters. Complement this with your travel expertise and you’ll be on your way to ghostwriting success.

The downside of ghostwriting is your ideas are not being written, and it’s not your voice. But, it would be a great experience and look good on your resume.

The keys to being a successful ghostwriter are: writing, reading a lot of good writing, and obtaining feedback on your writing. When obtaining feedback don’t forget to ask your target audience what they think. After all, they’re the ones who will be buying the book or audio CD!

Consider ghostwriting if you would like to supplement your travel writing. It’s a fantastic opportunity to strengthen your writing skills and to make extra cash. You never know who you’ll meet and it can lead to many writing opportunities. It’s a win-win situation!

Rebecca

Would you consider ghostwriting? Have you been a ghostwriter? What’s the story?

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